Last edited by Arashilmaran
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

6 edition of Lincoln & the politics of slavery found in the catalog.

Lincoln & the politics of slavery

by Wright, John S.

  • 146 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by University of Nevada Press in Reno .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 -- Views on slavery,
    • United States -- Politics and government -- 1845-1861

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 205-208.

      Statementby John S. Wright.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE457.4 .W73
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiii, 215 p.
      Number of Pages215
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5076474M
      ISBN 100874170273
      LC Control Number74113811

        Volume three, All the Powers of Earth, concerns the late s, years of division over slavery and the slide to civil war. “I think I have an . Eric Foner () contrasts the abolitionists and anti-slavery Radical Republicans of the Northeast who saw slavery as a sin, with the conservative Republicans who thought it was bad because it hurt white people and blocked progress. Foner argues that Lincoln was a moderate in the middle, opposing slavery primarily because it violated the republicanism principles of the Founding .

        Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery: The Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the Unionadds to Daniel W. Crofts's previous work examining the troubled time immediately preceding the Civil War with an intriguing account of the role played by the "other" thirteenth amendment that was proposed and debated during the winter and spring of Author: Joan Waugh.   Born in in the slave state of Kentucky, Lincoln was taken at 7 to live in southwestern Indiana, a region, Foner informs us, that was moderate in its views of slavery but pervaded by racism Author: David S. Reynolds.

        Eastman wrote of Lincoln: “He is a politician as every man must be who holds an important office, and such men, and only such, can kill Author: Eric Cortellessa. Daniel Crofts talked about his book, Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery: The Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the his book, he .


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Lincoln & the politics of slavery by Wright, John S. Download PDF EPUB FB2

A well researched and thought-provoking book about Abraham Lincoln and his position on slavery North Carolina Historical Review An essential study of Republican ideology and the political efforts to prevent secession in the months following Lincoln's election."/5(12).

"A well researched and thought-provoking book about Abraham Lincoln and his position on slavery."--North Carolina Historical Review “An essential study of Republican ideology and the political efforts to prevent secession in the months following Lincoln’s election.” --The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society.

A well researched and thought-provoking book about Abraham Lincoln and his position on slavery North Carolina Historical Review An essential study of Republican ideology and the political efforts to prevent secession in the months following Lincoln's election."Cited by: 5.

04/01/ With this intelligent and absorbing book, Crofts (Reluctant Confederates) resurrects the story of the "first" and long-forgotten 13th Amendment, proposed by moderate Republicans and Democrats during the secession winter and narrowly passed by Congress and "endorsed" by Abraham Lincoln in his inaugural address in an effort to Brand: The University of North Carolina Press.

Lincoln always hated slavery, but he also believed it to be legal where it already existed, and he never imagined fighting a war to end it. Inas part of a last-ditch effort to preserve the Union and In this landmark book, Daniel Crofts examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln's life: his role as /5(11).

In this landmark book, Daniel Crofts examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln's life: his role as the "Great Emancipator." Lincoln always hated slavery, but he also believed it to be legal where it already existed, and he never imagined fighting a war to end it.

Inas part of a last-ditch effort to preserve the Union and prevent war, the. As Daniel Crofts notes in Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery, in the otherwise profuse body of historical literature on the secession crisis and the outbreak of the Civil War, the Corwin amendment ‘gets no more than cursory treatment, fuzzy on specific details and at points simply misinformed’ (p.

Prior to Crofts’ book, the only. A historian examines Abraham Lincoln’s trajectory toward the ending of slavery. Crofts (History/Coll. of New Jersey; A Secession Crisis Enigma: William Henry Hulbert and “The Diary of a Public Man,”etc.) complicates the image of Lincoln as the Great Emancipator in this meticulously detailed history of American politics in the years leading up to the Civil War.

A well-written and exhaustively researched study, Lincoln & the Politics of Slavery is divided into four parts. The first examines the rise of the political anti-slavery movement, with special emphasis on the activities of Joshua Giddings, Salmon P.

Chase, and Charles Sumner and the growth of the Republican Party in the s. Abraham Lincoln - Abraham Lincoln - Early politics: When Lincoln first entered politics, Andrew Jackson was president.

Lincoln shared the sympathies that the Jacksonians professed for the common man, but he disagreed with the Jacksonian view that the government should be divorced from economic enterprise. “The legitimate object of government,” he was later to say, “is to do.

Lincoln and the politics of slavery: the other Thirteenth Amendment and the struggle to save the union/Daniel W. Crofts. pages cm Includes bibliographical references and index.

ISBN (cloth: alk. paper) ISBN (ebook) 1. Lincoln, Abraham, –—Political and social views. United States. Lincoln made this key overture in his first inaugural unearths the hidden history and political maneuvering behind the stillborn attempt to enact this amendment, the polar opposite of the actual Thirteenth Amendment of that ended slavery.

This compelling book sheds light on an overlooked element of Lincoln's statecraft and. Lincoln & the politics of slavery. Reno, University of Nevada Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Wright, John S., Lincoln & the politics of slavery.

Reno, University of Nevada Press, (OCoLC) Named Person: Abraham Lincoln; Abraham Lincoln; Abraham Lincoln: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. The book overflows with quotes from Republican politicians, Lincoln among them, stating categorically that the Constitution deprived the federal government of any authority to abolish slavery and that they had every intention of following its dictates/5.

Crofts unearths the hidden history and political maneuvering behind the stillborn attempt to enact this amendment, the polar opposite of the actual Thirteenth Amendment of that ended slavery. This compelling book sheds light on an overlooked element of Lincoln's statecraft and presents a relentlessly honest portrayal of America's most.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Lincoln's Political Thought' While Lincoln was an opponent of slavery, Mr. Kateb’s decision to mostly ignore politics and public policy in his book creates massive holes in Author: Michael Taube.

InAbraham Lincoln declared his hatred for the institution of slavery, likening his feelings of opposition to those of the abolitionists. Although the fact that Lincoln always disliked slavery is indisputable, the idea that he always opposed it with the zeal and fervor of the abolitionists remains questionable/5(13).

Read "Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery The Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the Union" by Daniel W. Crofts available from Rakuten Kobo. In this landmark book, Daniel Crofts examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln's Brand: The University of North Carolina Press.

Lincoln, the leader most associated with the end of slavery in the United States, came to national prominence in the s, following the advent of the Republican Party, whose official position was that freedom was "national," the natural condition of all areas under the direct sovereignty of the Constitution, whereas slavery was "exceptional" and sectional.

The Class Politics of the Civil War speech in the introduction to her book of their votes went to Lincoln. In the end, destroying slavery and suppressing the Slave Power amounted to. In this landmark book, Daniel Crofts examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln's life: his role as the "Great Emancipator." Lincoln always hated slavery, but he also believed it to be legal where it already existed, and he never imagined fighting a .My sixth book, Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery: The Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the Union, examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln’s life: his role as the “Great Emancipator.” Lincoln always hated slavery, but he also considered it legal where it already existed, and he never imagined fighting a war to end it.

Lincoln on the Verge follows the 16th president on his day journey to Washington in Februarycivil war imminent, the union falling apart. Almost years later, a coronavirus outbreak.